Oman Country Report - Middle East


2015

Oman: LVE Makes Teaching a Successful Process


“Most teachers dream of having a comfortable and joyful classroom environment,” reported Laila Al Gharbi, a teacher in Oman. “I started the new academic year with implementing what I have learned from Living Values workshops during the last five years. Living Values is an approach to education that makes teaching a successful process. My students are very happy with what I have been doing in the classroom since the beginning of the year.


Every day, they meditate and practice silence. The values I gently speak about as they sit in silence make them feel happy and think positively. I also did a Living Values Education activity using balloons and my students were creative in the way they expressed themselves through the values that they chose – peace, love, honesty, respect, unity, cooperation, freedom and kindness. We named the classroom groups according to the values they share. Living Values Education encourages me to be good to my students and to value them, and the activities I use lead to creativity and making positive changes in their behaviour.” 


Knowledge Talks – An interview with Helen Sayers

Helen Sayers was interviewed by Tariq Al Barwani on 13 January 2015 on his program “Knowledge Talks” on Radio Sultanate of Oman. An interesting interview on Living Values and the definition, importance and benefits of having values! To listen to the interview:



2012

New Teachers receive LVE Training before Heading into Classroom for First Time


A group of newly trained school teachers enjoyed a day of interactive creative activities, coordinated by Ms Laila Al Gharbi, a recent graduate teacher from Nizwa University. The workshop began with a reflection on personal and social values. The group then visualised ‘The School of My Dreams’ from which a lively discussion developed on how to create a values-based learning environment where children/students (and teachers!) feel happy, peaceful and motivated.

All agreed that every child needs to be loved, valued, respected, understood and to feel safe. In small groups, the teachers created a symbol to represent one of 'the five needs of the child'. They then discussed the skills and qualities of the teacher required to meet these needs. The long list included: Caring, Well-prepared, Dynamic, Entertaining, Cooperative, Accepting, Intuitive...

At the end of the day, everyone agreed that they felt ready to start their new teaching assignments with enthusiasm and confidence, and with lots of new creative ideas for integrating values into their daily activities.

Helen Sayers
Focal Point for LVE in Oman


2011



LVE has been quietly growing in Oman, a land with a long tradition of upholding values.

A workshop on values-based education was held at Nizwa University Oman on 3 October 2011. A group of newly trained school teachers enjoyed a day of interactive creative activities, coordinated by Ms Laila Al Gharbi, a recent graduate teacher from Nizwa University. The workshop began with a reflection on our personal and social values. The group then visualised ‘The school of my dreams’ from which a lively discussion developed on how to create a values-based learning environment where children/students (and teachers!) feel happy, peaceful and motivated.

All agreed that every child needs to be loved, valued, respected, understood and to feel safe. In small groups, the teachers created a symbol to represent one of 'the five needs of the child'. They then discussed the skills and qualities of the teacher that are required to meet these needs. The long list included: Caring, Well-prepared, Dynamic, Entertaining, Cooperative, Accepting, Intuitive....

At the end of the day, all agreed that they felt ready to start their new teaching assignments with enthusiasm and confidence, and with lots of new creative ideas for integrating values into their daily activities.